Email Templates for Photographers – Emotional + Difficult Conversations

$29.00

Over the course of the years I’ve spent in business, one of the things I’ve learned is that effective and efficient communication is one of the keys to success.
Finding your voice, as a business owner, can be downright difficult for many.  How do you speak with confidence without coming off as too confident?  How do you approach some of the difficult situations a business person can face in a way that is both understanding and fair to all involved?
I created email templates as a means to help others not only streamline their communication but to provide education to those who need to find their voice or refine the voice that they have.  Learning how to say things, when to say things and why certain things need to be said helps create a solid foundation for future communication skills.
Email templates are easily customized not only with your own content but with your own branding and personal elements because, let’s face it, people don’t want to receive robotic scripts from photographers who claim to want to develop a deep rapport.  These templates can be used as it or customized to fit your brand and your client’s needs but most importantly, they are a tool to help you find your voice and communicate clearly.
This is pack #3: Emotional + Difficult Conversations
There are times when, as a business person, you’re lost for words.  You know what you want to say but you have no idea how to say it.  These situations are often sensitive in nature and you no doubt want to tread carefully.  This template pack is totally customizable (to allow for your own actions, reactions and values to be inserted) but also politely yet firmly address a plethora of the sensitive issues that can arise when dealing with wedding clients.

 

Category:

53 customizable email templates that include:

  1. Client Requests Copyrights
  2. Client Requests to see “all the photos”
  3. Client says “Your price is too high”
  4. Response to wedding client wanting discounted prices.
  5. Response to wedding client wanting off-season/non peak discount
  6. Client sends you Pinterest photos for ‘inspiration’.
  7. Client sends a “shot list.”
  8. Clients Request for RAW Files (For Sale)
  9. Email response to a client requesting refund of deposit after cancelled wedding – version 1
  10. Email response to a client requesting refund or deposit after cancelled wedding – version 2
  11. Explaining Why You Won’t Shoot at a Discount
  12. Email response to request for costs associated with traveling to a destination wedding.
  13. Email response to request for free services in exchange of travel (or vice versa)
  14. How to Request Overdue Payments
  15. Overdue Payment Reminder #2
  16. Overdue Payment – Contract Violation
  17. Responding to multiple “when will my photos be ready” request
  18. Wanting to book 18+ months in advance
  19. Client not happy with engagement photos – the photos are actually fine
  20. Client not happy with engagement photos – you could have done better
  21. Client not happy with wedding photos – the photos are actually fine – version 1
  22. Client not happy with wedding photos – the photos are actually fine – version 2
  23. Client not happy with wedding photos – you could have done better
  24. Explaining pricing to friends (when a friend has made an assumption that they are going to get a discount)
  25. Explaining additional fees (additional editing, second shooters, props, etc.)
  26. Asking client to not text/facebook message you (setting boundaries)
  27. Telling your clients you’re pregnant: you can still shoot
  28. Telling your clients you’re pregnant: you definitely cannot shoot
  29. Telling your clients you’re pregnant: you may not be able to shoot
  30. Client hasn’t chosen the photos for their album
  31. Client hasn’t chosen the photos for their album (final notice)
  32. Client still hasn’t picked up album – final notice
  33. Client still hasn’t picked up USB – final notice
  34. Letting a client go
  35. Client mentions they will “edit their own photos” after booking
  36. Client requests a change of editing style after booking
  37. Client expected additional retouching that was not discussed/part of the process
  38. Discussing unrealistic timeline with a client
  39. Discussing “table shots” with clients
  40. Clients tagging you personally instead of your business
  41. Client’s not giving photo credit online
  42. Addressing a client who is applying filters/re-editing to your image
  43. When a client wants to revoke image usage permission after booking

 

Vendor/Wedding Professional Related

 

  1. Request to be a 2nd shooter – you’re not accepting
  2. Request to be a 2nd shooter – open to the idea
  3. Email Inquiry to Collaborate on a Styled Shoot – not interested
  4. Email inquiry to collaborate on styled shoot – open to the idea
  5. Mentor request – you do not mentor
  6. Mentor request – you offer mentoring
  7. Explaining image use to vendors
  8. Unauthorized internet use of an image by vendor
  9. Being asked to work for another vendor for exposure
  10. Dealing with a wedding planner who has created an unrealistic timeline for you

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