Email Templates for Photographers – Emotional + Difficult Conversations

$39.00

  1. Client requests copyrights
  2. Client wants raw photos
  3. Responding to “your prices are too high” #1
  4. Responding to “your prices are too high” #2
  5. Responding to blunt discount requests
  6. Responding to off-season discount requests
  7. Client continues insisting on a discount
  8. Client asks if you travel
  9. Requesting destination wedding in exchange for travel
  10. Explaining to friends + family why they don’t get a discount
  11. Requesting a wedding date too far in advance (18+ months)
  12. Explaining additional fees (second shooter, retouching, etc.)
  13. Client requests to see “all the photos”
  14. Client sends you Pinterest photos for “inspiration”
  15. Client sends you a huge must-have shot list
  16. Requesting overdue payments: version 1
  17. Requesting overdue payments: version 2
  18. Requesting overdue payments: contract will be terminated
  19. Clients mention they will “edit” their own photos
  20. Client requests change in editing style (after booking)
  21. Discussing unrealistic timelines with clients
  22. When a client wants “formal photos” at each table
  23. Venue visit: No
  24. Venue visit: Yes
  25. Asking for a different style/approach
  26. Client wants to remove image usage after booking
  27. Client unhappy with engagement photos: There’s no problem with the photos
  28. Client unhappy with engagement photos: You could have done better
  29. Client cancelling: version 1
  30. Client cancelling: version 2
  31. Client unhappy with wedding photos: There’s no problem with the photos #1
  32. Client unhappy with wedding photos: There’s no problem with the photos #2
  33. Client unhappy with wedding photos: You could have done better
  34. Upset client: Expected full retouching on all photos
  35. Client upset: wanted a photo of every guest
  36. Telling your client you’re pregnant: you still plan on shooting
  37. Telling your client you’re pregnant: you’re unsure if you can shoot
  38. Telling your client you’re pregnant: you can no longer shoot
  39. Client hasn’t chosen their album photos
  40. Client hasn’t chosen their album photos: final notice
  41. Client hasn’t picked up their album: final notice
  42. Client hasn’t picked up their usb: final notice
  43. Firing a client: Version #1
  44. Firing a client: Version #2
  45. Responding to “When will my photos be ready” email
  46. Clients tagging your second shooters business in their posts
  47. Clients not giving photo credit or tags on social media
  48. Clients who apply filters to social media photos
Category:
Over the course of the years I’ve spent in business, one of the things I’ve learned is that effective and efficient communication is one of the keys to success.
Finding your voice, as a business owner, can be downright difficult for many.  How do you speak with confidence without coming off as too confident?  How do you approach some of the difficult situations a business person can face in a way that is both understanding and fair to all involved?  There are times when, as a business person, you’re lost for words.  You know what you want to say but you have no idea how to say it.  These situations are often sensitive in nature and you no doubt want to tread carefully.  This template pack is totally customizable (to allow for your own actions, reactions and values to be inserted) but also politely yet firmly address a plethora of the sensitive issues that can arise when dealing with wedding clients.
Responding to angry clients is an artform and this guide includes examples of language we use when having difficult and emotional conversations with our clients.  This email template guide also include other difficult topics and sensitive situations that you may find yourself in, as a wedding photographer.
These templates are written in a neutral-professional voice; this means that there’s a lot of content in them that doesn’t have any particular personality associated with it.  They’re not overly peppy, overly bold, overly silly or any other kind of characteristic that your brand has – it’s up to you to change the voice to match your brand – but the content works with all brands.  (You don’t want to buy templates that say “LOL” in them if that’s not your brand, right?)
I created email templates as a means to help others not only streamline their communication but to provide education to those who need to find their voice or refine the voice that they have.  Learning how to say things, when to say things and why certain things need to be said helps create a solid foundation for future communication skills.
Email templates are easily customized not only with your own content but with your own branding and personal elements because, let’s face it, people don’t want to receive robotic scripts from photographers who claim to want to develop a deep rapport.  These templates can be used as it or customized to fit your brand and your client’s needs but most importantly, they are a tool to help you find your voice and communicate clearly.
This is pack #3: Emotional + Difficult Conversations
There are times when, as a business person, you’re lost for words.  You know what you want to say but you have no idea how to say it.  These situations are often sensitive in nature and you no doubt want to tread carefully.  This template pack is totally customizable (to allow for your own actions, reactions and values to be inserted) but also politely yet firmly address a plethora of the sensitive issues that can arise when dealing with wedding clients.
Responding to angry clients is an artform and this guide includes examples of language we use when having difficult and emotional conversations with our clients.  This email template guide also include other difficult topics and sensitive situations that you may find yourself in, as a wedding photographer.
These templates are written in a neutral-professional voice; this means that there’s a lot of content in them that doesn’t have any particular personality associated with it.  They’re not overly peppy, overly bold, overly silly or any other kind of characteristic that your brand has – it’s up to you to change the voice to match your brand – but the content works with all brands.  (You don’t want to buy templates that say “LOL” in them if that’s not your brand, right?)

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